NORTH AND BEYOND, SVALBARD

This semester our Architecture and the Extreme Environment Master course is aiming for the far north, beyond the Polar Circle, to Svalbard,  to study the growing communities affected by the melting ice cap and the large opportunities for transportation and resources that the north east passage now offers.

We firmly believe that an interdisciplinary approach to architecture can enrich the possibilities of dealing with the challenges of our world today, and that engaging with extreme environments can create a more resilient and sustainable architecture, as well as a platform for discussion on our role in an ever changing landscape.

PROGRAM AND AIM

From social unrest to economic swings, biological threats and demographic growth, from the extreme cold to desertification, all the way through an endless spectrum of environmental extremes, and polluted landscapes, our built environment faces challenges of an unprecedented scale and frequency.

It is the aim of this Master Course to engage in a serious and critical perspective with the unbalances in our world, and to be able to respond to a future of extremes.

This semester the course will engage through architectural design with the challenges of isolated and cold communities in the North Polar region, and use the latest developments in science and engineering to inform the design. Drawing from an international network of teachers and experts, from our contacts to NASA to our international network of scientists and the local Academic community in the the Lund campus, the students will be supported by reviews and lectures of the highest standard.

With a strong focus on research and first hand knowledge, the course will travel to one of the most extreme localities in the northern hemisphere, Svalabard. Where northern lights and polar bears, days with no sun, and days with no night, are the everyday reality for this community.

METHODOLOGY

The course is structured as a research and design strategy, with strong emphasis in engaging with real scenarios, from a critical and sustainable approach.

RESEARCH: A thorough understanding of the site and context  in question is charted and communicated visually as a constant reference to inform the design, but specially to aid the student to determine the program, encouraging responsibility in defining their relationship with architecture and the world around them.

During this phase, we will use our international and national researcher and experts to help with the latest in technology and science. Drawing from an international network of experts, the students will be supported by reviews and lectures.

SITE RESEARCH:  This semester our course is aiming for the far north, beyond the Polar Circle, to Svalbard, to study the growing communities affected by the melting ice cap and the large opportunities for transportation and resources that the north east passage now offers.

FORMALISATION: There will be strong focus on model making and 3D courses in computer digital drawing and modeling  methods. This is aimed at enriching the palette of media, and to manifest the projects in its best form. A final exhibition of the projects will take place in Lund and abroad.

RESEARCH FILED TRIP

The Advanced Architectural Design course “EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS AND FUTURE LANDSCAPES” is now open for subscription for the 2013 Spring Semester.

This semester our course is aiming for the far north, beyond the Polar Circle, to Svalbard, to study the growing communities affected by the melting ice cap and the large opportunities for transportation and resources that the north east passage now offers.

With a history of mining and exploration, Svalbard is today a growing community with its own university, a thriving tourist destination and overwhelming nature. Svalbard is located in perhaps the most challenging zone of the north pole due to global warming and the opening of the northeast passage to resources in north asia, it has become a political focus point and reference to urban structures in the extreme cold.

TOOLS

Several tools of representation will be taught, and available through out the course. From hand drawing to digital tools, model making and prototyping to animation. The workshop at the School of Architecture is a state of the art facility with 3D printers, wood work, metal and composites platforms.

3D digital tools: RHINO and MAYA course.

Advanced laser cutting techniques and 3D printing.

2D digital tools: Illustrator, and Autocad.

Animation techniques: Stop motion, IMOVIE and PREMIER course.

GENERAL TIME TABLE

21 January – Course start, lecture and course presentation.

The course will start with a two week research and preparation phase with lectures and courses to familiarise the student with the characteristics and challenges of cold weather environments. The research will be formalised in a models and boards.

2 February to 10 February – The second phase will be a week research trip to Svalbard. Here the site and program for the building design will be defined.

12 February – Research project and building program Review

The third and last phase will be of design and production where specific interests developed at Svalbard are manifested in an architectural program and design.

7 May- International Crit third phase review.

4 June – Final Crit and review with international panel. Exhibition opening.

COURSE TITLE: Advanced Architectural Design (AAHN06)

“EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS: NORTH AND BEYOND”

CREDITS: 15.0

COURSE EXAMINER: Prof. Christer Malmström COURSE DIRECTOR: David A. Garcia

ATTENDANCE: Maximum 20 students.

COURSE LANGUAGE: English

DURATION: One Semester (21 January – 5 June)

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